Why Dungiven Matters to Ballycastle & The Glens

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If the new facilities were developed in Dungiven, it would reduce revenue (annual year on year) costs by £70,000 for the new Causeway Coast and Glens Council. That is £70,000 saved each year, largely due to energy efficiencies found in new construction methods. To put it in context. That is £70,000 per year over the lifetime of the centre, taken at an average 40 years. That equates to £2.8million saving for the rate payer in the district – less the £350,000 initial capital investment. I can not stress this enough.
What is holding back Dungiven is equally holding back development in Cushendall, the Glens, Ballycastle and Loughgiel. Each an area of historical inequality and underinvestment. 
The reality for the new government authority is plain. If they wish to invest to enhance community and sporting facilities, they are obliged to do so in Nationalist and Republican areas where that historic inequality will require a generation of investment to balance out with those Councils who delivered for one section of the community. The stats are backed up by countless workshops and research done within and outwith the Council.
For the Glens Ward (Rathlin Ballycastle Loughgiel Waterfoot Cushendun Cushendall) inequalities to be addressed, it is vitally important that a common sense and business like approach is taken to Dungiven to release additional capital for the future. Other more unpalatable avenues are open to us as Councillors to raise funds should sectarianism continue to be the final arbitrator.
I was pleased to be asked to speak at the debate on Dungiven sports facilities last night in the County Derry town.
At the public meeting, those Unionists opposed to investing in Dungiven give no logically compelling, deeply informed or rational reason for blocking a perfectly sensible business case. That speaks for itself.

Moyle Equality Legacy Laid Waste in 120 Days of Supremacy In New Causeway Coast & Glens

Introductions. Councillor William Blair TUV Councillor Aaron Callan UUP Alderman Sam Cole DUP Councillor George Duddy DUP Alderman John Finlay DUP Alderman William King UUP Councillor James Alexander McCorkell DUP Councillor Alan McLean DUP Alderman Alan Robinson DUP

Some of the Members of the Causeway Coast & Glens who endorsed the Policy on flags: Councillor William Blair TUV Councillor Aaron Callan UUP Alderman Sam Cole DUP Councillor George Duddy DUP Alderman John Finlay DUP Alderman William King UUP Councillor James Alexander McCorkell DUP Councillor Alan McLean DUP Alderman Alan Robinson DUP Councillor Boyd Douglas TUV.

The euphoria combined with great expectations of a new brighter future are dead. Murdered by 100 days of unadulterated bigotry and old fashioned supremacy. For the people of the former District of Moyle, a council set up in 1972 to cater for that wild untamed fenian element that lives on the North Antrim Coast stretching largely from the village of Waterfoot through Cushendall, Cushendun, Carey, Armoy Glen and down into Ballycastle, it is the new and invigorated recalibration of the Orange State.

Moyle’s birth and very existence was down to the fact that Coleraine, Ballymena, Larne and in particular, Ballymoney’s ‘old school’ Unionist dominated representatives refused to countenance taking such a large base of the Nationalist  population. It’s political makeup could have tipped the balance of Unionist preeminence in each of the respective old legacy Council areas.

So Moyle, with the smallest population of 17,000, was little over half the size of the second smallest, Ballymoney with 32,000 and one of the largest geographical areas, battled its way from 1972 to March 2015 to provide for its ratepayers. With a low population base and no major industries it survived on a shoestring budget. It was fortunate in its geographical makeup with the Giant’s Causeway, the rope bridge, the Glens and of course Rathlin.  It battled hard to provide for all.

Now here’s the rub;

Moyle relied heavily on funding opportunities and voluntary organisations to make the ratepayers money go further. Officers became experts in obtaining funding of 80% 90% and up to 100% to finance projects that were simply out of their budget. Quay Road playing fields & synthetic turf, Ballycastle, Glenariff Forest Park, Millennium Park Bushmills, new sand based soccer pitch Dundarave, Changing facilities Dundarave, the Cottage Wood in Cushendall etc etc etc. Landscape schemes were applied for and funded at 100% right along the coast etc. The GAA in the area removed a massive burden from ratepayers, providing their own facilities, growing developing and working in close proximity with the Council to promote health and wellbeing.

Before Moyle Council ended, an Equality Impact Assessment concluded that on the basis of Services delivered in the community and sporting sectors, the ‘green Bantustan’ up beside Scotland had over delivered in the Causeway Ward (Unionist), and under delivered in Ballycastle while the Glens ward (the greenest of them all) needed serious investment and had been neglected. The message in these stats was that Republicans in Moyle had went out of their way to provide leadership and support the Unionist minority in the area.

No flags, emblems and a service delivery mechanism that supported everyone. It allowed everyone to adopt and foster their own identities, to feel equal. Those decisions manifested into strong community relations in the Glens and Ballycastle. It’s no accident that sectarianism is almost unheard of. There is no proliferation of flags and public bodies like schools, churches and voluntary groups work together without recourse to the question of one’s religion.

In contrast, Ballymoney Council chose to fly its Union Flag 365 days of the year. The community jumped on board following the lead. There is hardly a lamppost in the Town and most of the surrounding villages that flags don’t adorn. It’s only serious rival in flag proliferation, Coleraine, another legacy council. The two areas are bywords for sectarianism. A fundamental religious leadership applying the lowest common denominator to a population, drawn largely as those same political leadership might see it, from a lower caste.

The problem with the promotion of supremacy and the ideology that sees a young turk with a flute have the ability throw his arms apart and declare, ‘We are the People’ is its grotesque consequences. It’s no accident that the placing of one identity above  others allows for the dehumanising of an entire people.  The ideology allows those same people to burn 3 children in their beds in Ballymoney. It allows for the kicking to death of a father in Coleraine. It also generates enough hate for a ninteen year old to blow himself up in the pursuit of doing likewise to his catholic neighbour.

It does not end there. Those who make decisions to the detriment of the community over flags are the same people who are entrusted to make decisions for the benefit of the entire community on matters of business, finance, community development, infrastructure and wellbeing.

We have a stark choice as a community. We collectively face down the supremacist ideology espoused by those granted enough power by Stormont to create their own little Orange State on the North Antrim Coast. We also work together to maintain the relations carefully fostered over generations or we pass the area off into some horrible abyss.

M

Community Groups. The opportunity to have your say on RPA!

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COUNCIL NOTICE

Causeway Coast and Glens Community Support Framework Community Engagement Workshops

In 2015 the four Councils of Coleraine, Limavady, Moyle and Ballymoney will come together to form a new Causeway Coast and Glens Local Authority.

All councils have a responsibility for community services/support which includes capacity building, networking, resourcing the sector and information provision. Currently each council has different service provisions however, all have the same core aspects to their work. Each Council wants to involve community and voluntary groups and other interested individuals in the preparation of the new Framework which will help shape how the new Council will support communities and community groups in the future.You are invited to attend any of the following workshops:

Thursday 28 February 2013

2.30 – 4.00pm Limavady Borough Council, 7 Connell Street

6.00 – 7.30pm Coleraine Town Hall, The Diamond, Coleraine

Wednesday 6 March 2013

1.30 – 3.00pm Joey Dunlop Centre, 33 Garryduff Road, Ballymoney

6.30 – 8.00pm Sheskburn House, 7 May Street, Ballycastle

To book a place at any of the workshops please contact Community Places on 028 9023 9444 or email louise@communityplaces.info Please include your name / group’s name and details of any access or support needs.

You can also give your views and ideas by completing our on line survey at

www.surveymonkey.com/s/CommunitySupportFramework

Tourism/Leisure Complex in Ballycastle Equates to 1% on Rate.

A new Tourism-Leisure facility in Moyle would increase rates by as little as one percent under a new super-council arrangement set to be in place by 2014. But a Councillor Claims rates are set to fall further for the residents of the District as they become part of a new local government structure.

 

 

Following months of work Independent Councillor Padraig McShane is to present a case for the development of a Tourism-Leisure facility on the Quay Road, Ballycastle.

 

 

The Councillor is set to propose that Moyle prepare a robust case for the development to be put forward to the transition committee for consideration. The transition committee is made up of Councillors from Ballymoney, Coleraine, Limavady and Moyle areas that are set to make up the Causeway Coast and Glens Super-council.

 

 

It is believed that talks are already underway as other Councils recognise and have identified the need in Moyle.

Councillor Mc Shane himself a member of the committee said;

 

 

“The making of a case for this facility was never going to be easy. The history of Moyle has been one of excessive rates bills and very poor services. To develop a facility of that nature today would increase the rate by fifteen percent in Moyle. To develop it through the new super-council structures will increase the rate by only one percent.

 

“That fact belies the truth in real terms. Moyle ratepayers will see a substantial drop in their rates as an equilibrium is created throughout the Super Council area.”

 

 

The Councillor has visited several Leisure facilities and several Council areas to find out what ‘Best Practise’ models are being used to provide swimming and leisure facilities.

Councillor Mc Shane continued;

 

 

“What others take for granted, the people of Moyle are asked to do without. Our job as Councillors is not to make money but to offer services for residents. Moyle must position itself to address a historical legacy that has seen the needs of the local community, the business sector and indeed the tourism sector be ignored because of its geographical isolation and low population base.

 

“The needs analysis has already been completed alongside a  robust business case performed by one of Europes leading Leisure consultancies. It evidences the requirement for this facility in Moyle. The multi-million pound investment is a must for the sustainability of the North East corner of the new Super-council.

Meeting with the Head's of Leisure at Greenvale, Magherafelt's recently refurbished Leisure facility.

Meeting with the Head’s of Leisure at Greenvale, Magherafelt’s recently refurbished Leisure facility.